Welcome to the Chair for the Governance of Complex and Innovative Technological Systems!

Complex and innovative technological systems might not be intuitively associated with political science. Yet, from its very creation over its legal regulation up to its implementation on the ground, technology is often much more political than ‘technical’:

  • Politicians and institutions develop policies to foster technological innovation, due to its potential for economic growth and for a better society. Frequently, they do so without fully understanding – and remain far from controlling – these processes.
  • Whether a technology is ‘safe’ or not requires public deliberation and regulation, and the issue is often highly contested. In the respective public debates, technical and political arguments are usually intertwined.
  • Implementing technology as part of large infrastructure projects can make or break a decision-maker’s career. Hence, arguments made in favour of such a project can be (and often are) subjected to critical questions or even manifest protests by the wider public.

As you can tell, there is a complex relationship between politics, technology and society. This Chair aims to get a better understanding of that relationship and to find solutions for the most pressing problems. The Chair’s interdisciplinary team uses theories of complex systems and complexity-informed methods in empirical research. Our students benefit from highly interactive teaching methods applied in our BA and MA courses (taught in English).