Martin Acheampong

DOCTORAL FELLOW

______________________________________________________________________

Office: Feldkirchenstr. 21, Room: FG1/00.12, 96052 Bamberg, Germany
______________________________________________________________________

E-Mail:
martin.acheampong(at)uni-bamberg.de
Phone: +49(0)951/863-2367
______________________________________________________________________

Pillar 4: Governance, Institutional Change and Political Behaviour

Field: Political Science

Research Interests: Parliaments in Africa, Elections, Representation, Legislative Behaviour,
Intra-Party Competition, Emerging Democracies, Political Institutions
______________________________________________________________________

 

 


// DISSERTATION PROJECT


Acting in Whose Interest? Mass-Legislator Congruence in Emerging Democracies in Africa

What are the trade-offs for legislators in performing the various representational roles expected of them and how can variations in their inclination towards different roles and constituents be explained? More than two decades have passed since authoritarian regimes in many African states transitioned to representative democracy, yet theory-based empirical studies on the behavior of elected representatives in Africa are still rare. Since in modern states, the legitimacy of political rule is based on representative institutions, legislators become important actors who serve as a link between citizens and civil society on the one hand and political and administrative agencies on the other. It has been shown in existing research that legislators perform their representation function in different ways. They can either focus (a) on representing the interests of their constituencies or (b) their party (c) or emerge as participants in state-wide decision-making processes in which overarching policy priorities are legislated. Based on the observation that most legislators cannot fulfil each of these tasks in equal measure, my dissertation uses the comparative cases of Ghana and South Africa to investigate which emphasis is placed on the representational behavior of legislators in Africa. Theoretical models of representation behavior have highlighted the dependence of legislators on specific institutional incentives and electoral district features in setting their priorities. As a point of departure, this dissertation argues that legislators’ behaviour in emerging democracies [in Africa] may not only result from these exogenous and structural factors but more importantly from informal connections like clientelistic networks, religious value systems and individual-level resources. 


........................................................................................................................................................

// ACADEMIC BACKGROUND


2017 - Date
Doctoral Candidate in Political Science, Bamberg Graduate School of Social Sciences (BAGSS) - University of Bamberg

2015 - 2016
Master of Development and Governance, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany

2007 - 2011
Bachelors Degree in Political Science (Sociology & Social Work, minor), Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi - Ghana

........................................................................................................................................................

// EXPERIENCE


2017 - Date

Doctoral Researcher, Bamberg Graduate School of Social Sciences, University of Bamberg

2016 - 2017
Researcher, German Development Institute, Bonn - Germany

2016
Student Research Assistant, German Development Institute, Bonn - Germany

 

 

........................................................................................................................................................

 

MAIN PAGE | CONTACT | LEGAL | PRIVACY POLICY | DATENSCHUTZ | IMPRESSUM

 

© 2017 - 2018 Bamberg Graduate School of Social Sciences

Image Credits: © Bamberg Graduate School of Social Sciences